The Amazing Winners of the Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2022

The winner of the 2022 Astrophotographer Competition is an unusual shot of a rarely seen “dissociation event” when the solar wind cuts off part of a comet’s tail. The image is but one of the highlights of many of the world’s most famous astrophotography competitions.

“Once again, we had a fantastic year of astrophotography, and the participants have produced amazing images for the competition,” said Ed Bloomer, astronomer at the Royal Observatory Greenwich. “The level is incredibly high. It was really satisfying to see how many participants challenged themselves to capture extraordinary, rarely photographed or fleeting events: there are some things you haven’t seen before, and even some we will never see again.”

overall winner. Disconnection occurred. Tivoli Southern Sky Guest Farm, Khomas, Namibia. On December 25, 2021, a dramatic tail breakup occurred. A piece of Comet Leonard’s tail was cut off and carried by the solar wind

Gerald Rahman

Austrian photographer Gerald Riemann captured this year’s stunning winning photo in Namibia on Christmas Day. The shot looks at Comet Leonard, which was only discovered in early 2021, and Riemann was lucky enough to capture an extremely rare separation event before the comet leaves our solar system and will never be seen again.

Gerald explained, “A piece of Comet Leonard’s tail snapped off and was carried away by the solar wind. I was very fortunate that the weather at Tivoli Farm in Namibia was excellent when I opened the roof of the observatory. I realized that the comet’s tail looked interesting in the first image I took, so I decided to expand the field of view with a second image. And that’s where the breakup happened.”

Winner - Moon.  Prifle shade for Plato's eastern edge.  St Albans, Hertfordshire, UK.  Homemade Dobsonian Newtonian Reflector 444mm Telescope, Homemade Equator Tracking Platform Mount, Astronomik 642nm Infrared Filter Lens, ZWO ASI174MM Camera, 12.8 mf/29, Multiple exposures up to 29ms
Winner – Moon. Prifle shade for Plato’s eastern edge. St Albans, Hertfordshire, UK. Homemade Dobsonian Newtonian Reflector 444mm Telescope, Homemade Equator Tracking Platform Mount, Astronomik 642nm Infrared Filter Lens, ZWO ASI174MM Camera, 12.8 mf/29, Multiple exposures up to 29ms

Martin Lewis

Another feature in the Moon category award winner came from British photographer Martin Lewis. Judge Steve Marsh said this stunning shot highlights the staggering size of some of these moon craters.

“I never tire of looking at craters on the moon, but this shot of Plato amazed me with its long sweeping shadows,” Marsh said. “If you think about the length and size of those shadows and the mountains that make up, this photo is truly a deserved winner.”

Winner - Skyscapes.  stabbed stars.  Ningchi, Tibet, China, Sony ILCE-7R3 Camera, Tamron 150-500mm Lens, 150mm f/5.6, 75 x 30sec exposure
Winner – Skyscapes. stabbed stars. Ningchi, Tibet, China, Sony ILCE-7R3 Camera, Tamron 150-500mm Lens, 150mm f/5.6, 75 x 30sec exposure

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Other highlights show the international space expanse perched above the 1969 lunar landing site, the stars streaming behind a snow-capped mountain in Tibet, and a truly unique mosaic of several shots of the sun formed to resemble rings on a tree trunk.

Take a look through our gallery of all the amazing winners from this year’s competition.

Source: RMG

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